Ten of the best: Club America shirts

Ten of the best: Club America shirts

When you consider that they are the most successful club side in Mexican history and call the iconic Azteca Stadium home, it’s not hard to see why Club America have long remained one of the most instantly recognisable teams on the planet.

They also happen to have been very much blessed over the years with some of the finest kits the game has seen. So in celebration of Las Aguilla, we take a look at ten of their very best.

 

1994/96 home

 

 
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Where else could we start other than the 1994/96 home shirt. It’s not just Club America’s greatest ever shirt, it’s one of the best the game has seen. The Adidas diamond template fitted perfectly with the club’s vibrant colour scheme while the Coca-Cola sponsorship complimented the overall design nicely..  

 

94/96 away 

 

 

It seems a little cheap to include the away in the top 10, but really, just look at it. The away shirt of 94/96 was almost never used by the first team, though while rarely sighted on the field it has become almost as legendary among collectors as the home kit. Has a sides combined home and away ever looked so good? We’re not too sure.

 

2011 3rd/GK

 

 

In celebration of the club's 95th anniversary Nike created this eye-catching blue effort that was to be used as both a 3rd kit and as a goalkeeper kit for legendary stopper Guillermo Ochoa. The shirt has a very smart repeating pattern that is made up of both the club's initials and it’s year of foundation. 

 

01/02 Home

 

 

The 2001/02 season would see Club America winding up with an iconic pairing of Luis Hernandez and Ivan Zamorano up top, and they would be strutting their stuff in a very smart number from Nike. The designers elected to keep it simple and let the colour pallet do the work. A wise choice.

 

1998/99 home

 

 

An all-yellow effort with the club's logo blown up large on the front, the globe design that first appeared back in 1996 was a real break from tradition. The ditching of the sides traditional colour scheme could have caused controversy but it's a testament to the strength of the design that it is still treasured today. Bonus points have to be given for the asymmetric hoop pattern on the shorts, a very nice touch.

 

1997/00  away

 

 

As you’ve probably already guessed, if a design is good enough then we’re all for total continuity on the change strip. The away shirt worn from 1997 to 2000 featured the same globe pattern as the home kit in a more menacing navy blue, which, combined with the bold yellow accents and billowing sleeves, makes it all a bit menacing. We love it. 

 

2007/08 home

 

 

After years of simplifying, Nike’s asymmetric, feather shouldered, effort from 2007 was a beauty. The very smart design is a nod to the side's nickname, the eagles. The massive Bimbo sponsorship is a bit of a shame, but does little to detract from the overall effect.

 

1981/85 home

 

 

In 1981 Club America introduced a design so good it would remain largely unchanged for over a decade. The triangular block pattern proved the perfect fit for the sides yellow and blue colour scheme.. It is a little inexplicable that in the heat of Mexico, three quarter length sleeves had a bit of a moment in the 80’s. In this case though, it does little to detract from the overall look. A genuine classic.

 

1993/94 home

 

 

The last of the truly traditional efforts, the 1993/94 shirt is an absolute classic. The design is kept simple with a big badge, Coca-Cola sponsor and a large Adidas trefoil on the shorts. What more could you ask for?

 

2020/21 3rd/GK

 

 

The Club America 2021 third kit draws inspiration from traditional  Aztec patterns and is well on its way to being a modern classic. 

 

 

Extra credit has to be given for the way in which they have managed to integrate the outrageous number of sponsors into the design without breaking the illusion. A blueprint for future designs.

You can get your hands on either a vintage or modern Club America classic here.

 

Words by Andy Gallagher

 

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